Easy Flaxseed Crackers Recipe

This healthy flaxseed cracker recipe comes together quickly with just a few simple ingredients. It has the perfect light flavor for satisfying midday cravings and pairs well with a variety of dips and toppings.

Sara Seitz

By Sara Seitz

157 Ratings

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Vegan Flax Crackers

Crackers are one of those super simple snacks that always hit the spot. But most you pick up at the grocery store aren’t actually all that simple. Nearly all have dozens of ingredients and plenty are packed full of unhealthy saturated fats.

So why not skip the cracker aisle and make your own crackers at home? With this super simple and super delicious flaxseed cracker recipe, you can do just that.

With just two main ingredients and a pinch of spices, this truly is one of the easiest flaxseed cracker recipes out there. These crackers have the perfect dash of flavor to satisfy and are loaded with healthy omega-3 fatty acids and fiber so you can feel good about snacking on them. Plus they go great with many dips, including hummus and mock salmon dip.

Why You’ll Love Making These Flaxseed Crackers

  • So easy. Did I mention these minimal ingredient crackers only take 35 minutes to prep and cook?
  • Simple ingredients. There are no long ingredient lists here. Just simple, healthy staples for a satisfying snack.
  • Clean. These crackers are dairy, gluten, soy, and grain-free for a healthy snack everyone can enjoy.
  • Satisfying. They may be easy, but that doesn’t mean they won’t hit the spot. These crackers feature the perfect mix of earthy flaxseed, zesty garlic, and salt.
  • Low-carb. Flax is naturally low in starch, making these a great keto snack and highly diabetic-friendly.
  • Healthy. No saturated fats here. Just plenty of healthy omegas, fiber, minerals, and antioxidants. 
Vegan Flax Crackers in Ramekin

What Are Flaxseeds?

Flaxseeds, sometimes written “flax seeds,” are produced by the flowering plant, Linum usitatissimum

These seeds are true seeds, not grains. Like other seeds, they are high in fat and low in starch. What makes flaxseed so popular as a health food is its high omega-fatty acid content.

Flaxseeds come in brown or golden varieties. Both are high in omega-3 and alpha-linoleic acid. But brown seeds have a bolder, toasted flavor, while golden seeds are buttery and slightly sweet.

Either type works well in the recipe below. We recommend trying it both ways to see which flavor profile you prefer!

Key Ingredients

  • Ground flaxseed. When working with ground flaxseed, it is always best to buy whole seeds and grind them yourself just before using them. Ground flaxseed goes rancid fast, so fresh ground provides the most flavor and the best nutrition. You can learn more here.
  • Garlic powder. We love the natural toasted flavor of flaxseeds, but adding a dash of garlic powder is key to highlighting that earthy goodness.
  • Onion powder. Another of our favorite allium spices, onion powder brings a touch of sweetness and zest.

Quick Overview: How to Make Flaxseed Crackers

For this simple recipe, all you’ll need is a single mixing bowl, a baking sheet, and a rolling pin. Everything comes together very quickly and cooks in just 20 minutes.

You can find the full recipe card for flaxseed crackers at the bottom of this post. For now, let’s take a quick look at the process.

  1. Mix all the ingredients. Stir until a uniform dough forms.
  2. Roll dough over a parchment-lined baking sheet. Shoot for a uniform thickness of ⅛ to ¼ inch.
  3. Cut into squares. Don’t worry about cutting all the way through, the crackers will snap apart after baking.
  4. Bake. They’re ready once the edges begin to brown.
Flax Crackers in Cookie Sheet

Quick Overview: How to Make Flaxseed Crackers

For this simple recipe, all you’ll need is a single mixing bowl, a baking sheet, and a rolling pin. Everything comes together very quickly and cooks in just 20 minutes.

You can find the full recipe card for flaxseed crackers at the bottom of this post. For now, let’s take a quick look at the process.

  1. Mix all the ingredients. Stir until a uniform dough forms.
  2. Roll dough over a parchment-lined baking sheet. Shoot for a uniform thickness of ⅛ to ¼ inch.
  3. Cut into squares. Don’t worry about cutting all the way through, the crackers will snap apart after baking.
  4. Bake. They’re ready once the edges begin to brown.

Variations and Substitutes

There isn’t much to this recipe, which means there aren’t a lot of substitutes you can make. But there are plenty of great ways to jazz it up by adding some extra ingredients.

  • Whole flaxseed. Add a couple of tablespoons of whole flaxseed to your bowl. These add texture and give the crackers a nice visual appeal.
  • Sesame seeds. Another option is to add whole sesame seeds to the mix. Sesame seeds are a great source of fiber, minerals, and protein plus they add a nice nutty flavor.
  • Pepper. For a bit of spice, add ¼ teaspoon of black pepper to your dough.
  • Top with salt. If you love a salty cracker, top your rolled dough with coarse sea salt before cooking. Use your roller to gently press the salt into the dough.
  • Substitute vegetable broth. One simple way to inject an extra heaping of flavor into these crackers is to use vegetable broth in place of water.
  • Nutritional yeast. If you like your crackers cheesy, try adding a tablespoon of nutritional yeast to the mix. Not only does this give the crackers an umami flavor, but it also provides valuable B12 that most vegans need.

Recipe Tips

Again, this is such an easy recipe I don’t have much to say here other than to make sure you line your baking sheet.

Parchment paper works best to keep the dough from sticking to the pan. If you’re out of parchment, you can use oil to grease the pan. Just be sure to get full coverage to prevent disaster. 

The Best Vegan Flax Crackers

Storage Tips

Once your crackers have cooled, place them in an airtight container. 

They will store nicely on the counter or in the pantry for about 2 weeks. You can get a little longer shelf life out of them if you place them in the fridge, but they tend to lose their crunch when you do this.

For me, I eat these up so fast, there’s no need to extend their shelf life!

Frequently Asked Questions

Why are my flaxseed crackers sticking?

This dough gets really sticky, so it’s important to use parchment paper between the dough and the pan. If you don’t have parchment, you can use oil, but make sure to be thorough. There’s nothing worse than a batch of broken crackers because some got stuck to the baking sheet.

Can I use pre-ground flaxseed meal?

You can, but we don’t recommend it. The fragile fats in flaxseed go rancid quickly when exposed to oxygen and take on an unpleasant fishy flavor. Health and flavor-wise, it’s much better to grind flaxseed right before you use it.

More Fun Recipes with Flax

Flax is such a healthy, versatile food (you’ve heard of flax eggs, right?). So, there’s no reason not to include these in your diet as much as possible. And for vegans and vegetarians, these little seeds provide a valuable source of essential omega-3 fatty acids.

To get more flax goodness in your life, try these other flax-full recipes.

Vegan Flax Crackers

Flax Seed Crackers

This easy flaxseed cracker recipe contains only freshly ground flaxseed and spices for an oil-free, low-carb snack packed with nutrition. With a yummy toasted flavor, they pair perfectly with many dips and toppers.
Click stars below to rate, or leave a full review in the comments
157 Ratings
Print Rate it Now Pin Recipe
Course: Snack
Cuisine: American
Diet: Vegan, Vegetarian
Keyword: flax seed crackers recipe
Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cook Time: 20 minutes
Total Time: 35 minutes

Ingredients

  • 2 cups ground flaxseed Use freshly ground flaxseed to avoid a fishy taste.
  • 1 cup water start with 3/4 c. and add more as needed to make a workable dough
  • ½ tsp salt
  • ½ tsp garlic powder
  • ½ tsp onion powder

Instructions

  • Preheat oven to 400 degrees. 
  • In a large bowl, combine all the ingredients and mix until an even dough forms. 
  • Spread evenly onto a parchment or silicone lined baking sheet – about 1/8-1/4 inch thick. Gently cut dough into squares on the baking sheet (you just need to score the dough so it snaps after it’s baked – be careful not to cut up your silicone mat or cookie sheet!) 
  • Bake for 20-30 minutes until crisp and edges are browned but not burnt.

Recommended Tools & Products

Large Cookie Sheet
Parchment Paper
Tried this recipe?Mention @CleanGreenSimple or tag #CleanGreenSimple!
Sara Seitz

About the Author

Hi and thank you for wanting to get to know me and my passions.

I’m a professional freelance writer with decades of experience learning about and living a green, clean life.

I grew up in Colorado under the influence of three generations of knowledgeable women who knew their way around the garden. I graduated from Colorado State University with a bachelor of science in biology and a minor in English. A year before graduation, my life was upended by an unexpected diagnosis of Type 1 Diabetes.

Facing the reality of living with an incurable autoimmune disease I left to reflect hard on my lifestyle. While this type of diabetes cannot be cured or treated with diet, I was certain that focusing on her health and fueling her body with clean food would help her better manage her condition. As a lifelong animal lover, it wasn’t difficult for me to transition fully to a vegan diet.

Inspired by the changes I felt after going vegan, I sought out a community of like-minded plant-based eaters, gaining knowledge and experience that would fuel my future career.

In 2018, I brought my daughter into the world. Wanting the opportunity to be home to raise her, I decided to pursue a career as a freelance writer, starting my own company in 2019. http://penandpostwriter.com

Today, I’m lucky to have a long list of clients who pay me to write about my many passions. At the top of that list is gardening and eating a clean diet for the sake of my health, the planet, and all the animals I love.

When I’m not constructing articles for clients, you can find me wrist-deep in dirt in my vegetable garden, hiking with my dogs, or back in front of the computer creating imaginative worlds in my quest to become a published fiction writer. More articles by Sara.

sara@cleangreensimple.com

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111 thoughts on “Easy Flaxseed Crackers Recipe”

  1. 5 stars
    My first go at these was not bad!

    I definitely would recommend trying and if your sceptical of the tastes like health add a touch more herbs. Till your pallet adjusts to healthier.

    Any storing tips? I will go back over the blog but I’m thinking the fridge? Or will a airtight container in pantry be alright?

    Reply
  2. 5 stars
    Fourth time for making these crackers. Love them. I have added finely chopped red bell pepper, jalapeno, onion, finely shredded carrot. I also use Chia seed for personal health reason and they work fine and never had a fishy smell. Also lemon juice, onion powder, garlic powder, and Mediterranean spices. I also dehydrate them for about 17 hours as I believe more healthy. Thank you for the recipe!!

    Reply
      • Hi Diane,
        Sadly Jessica, the author passed away in 2019 and her thoughts went with her. Her article though admitted not having a dehydrator, instead using an oven, so we can’t answer your question.
        Cheers
        John

        Reply
  3. Easy recipe with all good stuff-will be a keeper, for sure. Provides great versatility for seasonings, too, based on the other reviews (many thanks for the feedback, all!).

    Reply
  4. 5 stars
    I loved this recipe! I had only ground flaxseed (that was several years old!) on hand, but if there was a fishy flavor/odor, it escaped my notice. I sprinkled in some rosemary instead of the onion and garlic powders, and I topped the crackers with coarse kosher salt. The crackers on the edge baked crispier than those in the middle because they were thinner – I think next time I’ll do multiple smaller batches so I can get a more even thickness. I made this recipe in order to use up my ground flaxseed that I’d had unused for so long, but I may have to keep buying it now and make this a staple!

    Reply
  5. 4 stars
    Interesting. I made them today and they are good. I definitely want to tweak it to my tastes. What was curious, is I keep my flax in the freezer and I ground them fresh and still had a fishy odour. That seems to be going away as they cool and is not noticeable when eaten with something. I definitely want more seasonings next time and I had to double the recipe to fill my pan, which I will do again if I make them again.
    Thanks!

    Reply
  6. 5 stars
    So easy! And vegan and delicious.

    Thank you for helping me live better – and save money on $6 boxes of flax crackers.

    I never again have to walk by a box of flax crackers at Whole Foods with a wistful gaze.

    Reply
    • I know- I made them but had to do a recipe and a half. The smell of the crackers baking was wonderful. I, also spend a fortune on flax “flackers” seed crackers at Whole Foods. I will add chia, hemp seeds, more spices.

      Reply
  7. I haven’t tried yet. But can’t wait to try them. I have been looking for a cracker recipe. What is calorie count and nutritional count if you have it. I am just starting eating like this. I am having trouble knowing how much I can eat of each thing. Thanks.

    Reply
    • 1 star
      Made these today. Added sesame seeds and some other savory seasoning. Too fishy! And I like fish. But the flavor was too overpowering. Husband said same thing. Disappointed because I was looking forward to adding flaccid to daily diet.

      Reply
      • Flaxseed only smells and tastes fishy when it is rancid. Buy fresh flax seed, mill them at home before using. Store the unused seeds in the fridge.

        Reply
  8. This was easy, quick, and they came out perfect. I had not tried these crackers before. It has a fish oil type flavor, which is odd because I use the same flax meal in my keto bread, and no fishiness comes through. I believe these crackers would be great dipped in some fish patte, or tuna salad. Since there is a slight fish oil flavor to the crackers, perhaps some seaweed and a bit of lemon zest might work added to the recipe, and some mackerel and sardine patte to dip them in. People say I’m crazy, but I am seriously so.

    Reply
  9. 5 stars
    Great recipe! I substituted the ground flaxseed with Golden Flax Meal. I put the dough between two parchment paper sheets and rolled it thin with a rolling pin. Flattening it with the hand works well too. I scored the dough with a pizza slicer before baking. That makes it easier to to separate the crackers without breaking them after they’re baked. The baking was increased to 40 minutes, to make them crispier. Next time I will be more adventurous with flavour and seasoning. I definitely recommend this recipe!

    Reply
  10. Mine were fishy and I used good flaxseed. I don’t like fish so probably won’t try these again. The recipe works just fine it’s my taste buds.

    Reply
  11. 4 stars
    Great recipe with tips. I added sun dried tomatoes, nutritional yeast, turmeric and some acv. I also spread this out on two cookie sheets for thinner Keto crackers.
    Thank you!

    Reply
  12. 5 stars
    Just the recipe I was looking for. I was afraid that they would taste oily or fishy as reported in some of the comments. But I just made a batch and they came out great. But it’s important that the crackers be totally dry, otherwise they do taste oily. Easier to get them crisp if they are on the thin side.

    I don’t know if this has been mentioned in some of the comments but a study in 2013 showed that 1oz. flaxseed per day lowered systolic blood pressure by 10 points and diastolic by 7 over a period of 6 months. Beats some medications. Worth a try.

    “..flaxseed induced one of the most potent antihypertensive effects achieved by a dietary intervention.”

    [link removed by admin]

    Reply
  13. 5 stars
    These flax crackers look so zesty and tasty! Absolutely love your creative idea! Thanks, Jessica for sharing!

    Reply
  14. 5 stars
    Just made these. They are delicious. Thx much for the inspiration. Great way to add flax to your diet. Next time i will try eliminating the salt in the batter, and instead sprinkling some on top.

    Reply
  15. Eating some right now! I added hemp seeds to mine (like 2 or 3 Tbsp ) for some added protein. Very good and easy recipe! Thank you!

    Reply
  16. I’ve found the fishy smell is much less if I use Bob Red Mill’s Premium Gold Flax. That’s what I use when I’m making a cinnamon version, which I use with fruit spread in the mornings. The darker flax is okay for garlic/parmesan/chili. Just a thought! 🙂

    Reply
  17. Yes! Flax meal and ground flax seed are the same thing. You can even make your own, but since it’s so cheap either way, why would you? The organic Walmart brand is great at a great price!

    Reply
  18. Hi. I enter everything in MyFitnessPal. There is a huge calorie difference between a cup of unground flaxseed and a cup of ground flaxseed. Do you mean a cup of unground, then grind? No-one else has asked this question so maybe it is obvious to everyone else!!

    Reply
  19. This is a great base for just a little mashed pumpkin, some crushed pumpkin seeds, and dried cranberries for Thanksgiving loving. I’m trying out flax milk for cheese, hope it doesn’t end up too grainy – I bought “superfine muslin cloth” for a smooth finished product. Nothing like cheese and crackers.

    Reply
  20. Someone above added honey; I think I’ll try maple syrup and maybe some finely chopt walnuts. Grinding your own flax is the only way to go – small Braun spice/coffee grinder/chopper is perfect.

    Reply
  21. 5 stars
    I mixed mine with ground Tigernuts, cinnamon powder and cayenne pepper. Excellent result.
    Will try it next with raisins, and perhaps grated coconuts.

    Reply
  22. These are just going in. I used the whole cup of water but the flax dough was really thick. Did the best I could but should I have used more water? Not sure what the consistency should be.

    Reply
  23. Flax seeds are very sturdy seed. Impossible to break open with our human teeth. They need to be ground for us to benefit from the nutrients they contain. Check out Nutritionfacts.org for more beneficial nuggets…be loved

    Reply
  24. Awesome! I was literally just feeling like I wanted some low carb crackers to eat with pate and I found this page. I’ve got plenty of flax seed so I’m off to get creating. 🙂

    Reply
  25. I too grew up on Jiffy brand corn mix. But my mother made it in a 9 x 9 brownie pan. Will this recipe work with that, or will it need temperature or timing adjustments. Thanks for another great recipe!

    Reply
  26. Just found, and ove, your friendly website ~ I put fresh ground flax on something every day. I have a book on flax seeds ! I am tempted to add other seeds like sesame, poppy, chopt sunflower or pumpkin seeds, etc. Thanx for this inspiring recipe, I have always been a health freak; but have simplified my diet and ingredients even more lately and this is a great gift too ! P.s. Always keep flax seeds in the fridge !

    Reply
  27. mine were dark too i used bob’s red mill flaxmeal. cooked them 25 min and they were not too crispy. i thought i should have added more water but given that they werent crisp even with what i thought was not enough i guess not. they have a good flavor and i have to control myself eating them. afraid i will be in bathroom all day tomorrow!

    Reply
  28. Hi! To answer your question…it depends. lol Not a great answer, I’ll admit, but it really does depend on such disparate things as humidity, type of grinder, etc. What I would do is experiment and keep notes. Measure (for example) 1 cup of seeds, grind them and measure the resulting meal carefully. Extrapolate from there. An half an hour in the kitchen should give you an approximate idea. Freeze any leftovers in a non-self-defrosting freezer. (The self-defrosters have extreme temperature swings as they warm up to melt the ice, warming our food in the process.) You probably figured all this out already, but just in case…

    Reply
  29. 5 stars
    Made these in half quantities, and added Rosemary instead of garlic. I don’t have baking paper so I used foil with a wipe over of vegetable oil instead. They are really tasty, but mine were much darker (I used ‘milled flax seed’) from holland and barret. They’re really tasty, kind of nutty. I loved them, partner said not their taste ,too much like nori…hehe, more for me!

    Reply
  30. There is a vital reason these should be made in a dehydrator – flaxseeds in particular are very oily and these oils turn toxic with heat…thus, dehydrate no higher than at 37 degrees C

    Reply
    • You used too much water. Next time, start with less than you used previously. Add additional water 1 teaspoon at a time until you have a suitable dough.
      This method of mixing, should solve your issue.

      Reply
  31. I am making these crackers right now and my house smells so amazing. Can’t wait to try them with my sundried tomato tapenade. Thank you for the recipe and tips

    Reply
  32. 5 stars
    I love this recipe, it’s so simple. I added fresh rosemary sprigs and ground sea salt, I also rolled the dough between parchment paper which gave me two batches. I prefer them thin and they taste great, hubby loves them as well

    Reply
  33. 5 stars
    I looked & looked for flax seed crackers in stores, couldn’t find any, searched online and found your recipe. I had Hodgson Mill’s milled flax seed on hand, garlic powder & chili powder, making the crackers was so easy, different from anything I’ve ever baked, but easy. And more important, they are good! Now I have a healthy snack on hand went I want to crunch on something or want to hold off hunger for a while. I keep them in a ziplock bag on the frig freezer door, sometimes eat them with Cabot cheddar or Smucker’s Natural Peanut Butter (only peanuts, no sugar, no added fat, only a trace of salt). I thought of sending the recipe to Hodgson Mill, but it isn’t my recipe, it’s yours, it would be a great addition to their recipes.
    Sincerely, Sally Donaldson

    Reply
  34. 5 stars
    Just out of the oven they taste great with guacamole I spiced them up with cumin, red pepper flakes, and nutritional yeast. I didn’t get them as thin as stated but next time I will. This will be my new go to cracker!

    Reply
  35. 5 stars
    I have these in the oven right now to dip into Frank’s Redhot Buffalo Chicken Dip. My secret ingredient, shhhhh, will be bacon. hahaahahaa. Can’t wait til they’re both done! Also, I will be making another variation of these with coconut sugar and cinnamon for a “graham cracker”. That will be most welcome! Thanks for a recipe this gluten/sugar free girl can enjoy!

    Reply
  36. Are you buying whole flaxseed or flaxseed meal? If you are buying the meal, it very well could be rancid. Whole flax keeps well; meal goes rancid easily. I use a coffee grinder to grind mine. Hope that helps.

    Reply
  37. Nutritional yeast often doubles well as a “cheesy” addition. I’d start there and if that doesn’t hit the spot then delve into vegan cheeses which can be tricky. Good luck!

    Reply
  38. I have been looking for cracker recipes because I am cutting down on wheat. This is very easy and tasty, also tried honey and 1 tsp cinnamon, good but will add more cinnamon next time. I plan to store in a tin, is this the best way to store them and keep them crisp? how long can I store crackers?

    Thanks you,
    Grandma B

    Reply
  39. According to NutritionaData – these crackers contain:

    (Per cracker)

    Calories – 21.6
    Fat – 1.4
    Carbs – 1.7
    Fiber – 1.2
    Net Carbs – 0.6
    Protein – 0.9

    Reply
  40. 5 stars
    I am so thrilled to see this recipe and I wll be making these this afternoon! Flax has zero net carbs so these will be perfect for my low carb diet! Thank you!

    Reply
  41. 5 stars
    just what i was looking for, for my hummus. I just recently found I am allergic to wheat, yeast and gluten so this is great and you can mix it up! Going to store today and seeing what i can add to them to make a variety! Thanks so much!

    Reply
  42. 5 stars
    They smell fishy because they have Omega 3 in them… same as fish. If you’ve ever taken an Omega 3 supplement and then burped, you’ll taste a nasty fishy taste. FORTUNATE, these crackers DON’T taste nasty. They’re yummy!

    Reply
  43. 5 stars
    I just made these with salt only -sooooooo delicious! Probable would be yummy with rosemary, too. What would you say is the calorie count on each 2 inch square?

    Reply
  44. I’m trying these right now! I’m going to use them as substitutes for graham crackers in s’mores. 🙂 I added a bit of honey, guava, and cinnamon. Thanks for the recipe!

    Reply
  45. Just did a quick calculation using the calorie information on the back of my ground flaxseed package. Since this recipe gets all its calories from flaxseed, the calories for the whole recipe are 960. If you make the 24 crackers, that is 40 calories per cracker. Sorry, I don’t have time to calculate the rest of the values at the moment. I’m looking forward to trying this recipe on my wheat free diet.

    Reply
  46. 5 stars
    Oh these are just what I was looking for! Thank you so much. I am going to make a nice big batch tomorrow. I am a new vegan and looking for easy ways to beat snack attacks.

    Reply
  47. Can you eat too many flax seeds? Is there a limit? I saw on Dr. Oz that 2T a day will cut hot flashes in half so I’m going to try these crackers.

    Reply
  48. Thank you for this recipe because it’s been on my mind to make these! Going to after work today. Can’t wait to check out the rest of your site to later!

    Reply
  49. My experience was that they needed to be sure and be thin so they would turn out crunchy; mine turned out soft and kind of eh. I would surely keep making them but maybe add spices like some of the above to give them some more flavor. I did use them for low carb and added cheese but if you are relying on them for a diet that forbids that, spice it up! They were very very easy.

    Reply
  50. 5 stars
    Thanks for posting this recipe!! Just made them…but did not have enough flax meal on hand (only had 1 1/2 cups) so added 1/2 cup of chia seeds!! So good. After 10 minutes of bakign started smelling fishy (though my flax has been in the freezer)…but taste fine! (hopefully I’m not going to make myself sick). My 3 year old loves them (with vegan butter on them). So yummy!! Also, can’t do onion so did 1 tsp garlic and almost a full tsp of salt. Love how easy this is to make too!!

    Reply
  51. Any ideas on how to make them cheesy while still being vegan and soy free? Just found out my daughter is allergic to soy, egg and milk to mention a few and I’m trying to find an alternative to gold fish:) I don’t know much about vegan cheese yet. Thanks:)

    Reply
  52. google search led me to this. enjoyed the recipe. i grind my own flax so no issues of rancidity there. i really do love dehydrated flax crackers but sometimes i am impatient. thanks for this!

    Reply
  53. Yay! All recipes for flax crackers are “raw” versions that require a) cooking at low heat in the oven for 8+ hours (not exactly eco-friendly) or b) using an expensive dehydrator. I love hummus and almond butter and am trying to cut out most wheat and gluten from my diet – after 2 weeks I’m noticing significant results, most especially that my carb cravings are nil and I don’t feel as tired as I used to when I’d eat wheat products. Anyhow, I know flax is great for you, and just last week bought some flax meal to enjoy as a hot cereal – it’s filling, tasty, and can be customized in so many ways! Thanks, Jessica! I look forward to making a spicy version of these crackers with fresh jalapenos…
    PS: flax meal MUST be refrigerated to keep it from going rancid – I’m learning a lot in a book I’m reading, called “Lose the Wheat, Lose the Weight.” 🙂

    Reply
  54. I made these last night at home. The flaxseed meal we used was a lot darker than sample pictured in the photo, and I used other spices to flavor the dough. It helped to use olive oil on my fingers to spread the dough evenly throughout the baking pan. Sprinkled with toasted sesame seeds for extra flavor. Baked 15 minutes and no burned crackers. Husband LOVED them! Even took some to work with him today to eat with his tuna fish. Perfect for the low-carb dieter!!

    Reply
  55. have the same fishy smell issue. I think that if you use 4/5 whole flax seed and about 1/5 grownd it will reduce the smell. what do you think?

    Reply
    • Definitely. I have only made my flax crackers in the dehydrator and this with slight variations has always been the recipe. Realize that if you dehydrate on low to keep the enzymes alive (approx 105 degrees) it could take 24 to 48 hours to have them crispy enough…

      Reply
  56. 4 stars
    I too had the fishy issue. I had kept my flax refrigerated, but I got the rancid fishy taste too. Don’t know what can be done there as we are pretty much at the mercy of suppliers and we don’t know how old their stock is.

    Reply
  57. 4 stars
    I was so excited to try these but I’ve made them twice now with fishy results 🙁 I was also told that the flax could be rancid but it smells fine, the dough smelled fine, smelled good when cooking but then the last few minutes of baking it started to smell bad and now they all taste so fishy I can’t stomach them! I’m so bummed.
    Do you think if I buy flax at a big store (Bob’s Red Mill) that there is a chance it’s sat out too long on the shelf? Maybe if I buy from a natural food coop it would be better? I need help! I really want to make these and love them.
    Any tips would be great!

    Reply
  58. What an easy recipe. The crackers look delicious and exactly what I have been looking for (I am currently doing a cleanse and can’t have wheat, sugar, etc).

    Reply
  59. 5 stars
    I loved these! I made a savory seed version with sesame, poppy, and rye seeds and then made a graham style one with some molasses, honey, and cinnamon. These were perfect. Easy, customizable, and deliciously free of all the things that my son is allergic too. Thanks – I’ve shared this recipe (through your site) with everyone I know! It is always good to feel empowered by options when allergies seem to confine and limit. This one gives us some choices.

    Reply
  60. This looks good! I got a couple of questions 🙂 how much flaxseed do I need to ut in the food processor to obtain 2 cups of ground flaxseed? and do you happen to know the nutrition facts for these crackers? Thanks! 🙂 I will try to make them later.

    Reply
  61. I just found this great page with recipe and super helpful pics. As I read the comments, Bethany’s experience reminded me of reading once that omega 3s are what make fish fishy! I think it would be more pronounced in older oil. I know we’re supposed to buy freshest seed possible and grind as we use but sometimes, the flax seed available will just be fresher than others, no?
    So excited to try this recipe for myself and others I know who want to try a flax and chia seed combo cracker! Chia is even higher in omega 3s and other nutrients than flax! You’re not supposed to have to grind chia to get the benefits, but they’re the size of poppy seeds! How do you chew that?! A cracker!!!

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  62. Just what I was needing. I am on a general cleanse, eating mostly raw and no gluten, sugar, daity, etc … and just HAPPENED to have a bag of Bob’s Red Mill Fax Meal in the freezer. Really, this is going to be PERFECT for my guacs, dips, & spreads. YUMMY. Thank you.

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  63. 4 stars
    I just made these and I love them! However, they smell and taste fishy! I heard that’s because the flax seeds are rancid but I just bought the meal from my grocery store already ground. I think I will have to buy fresh from now on.

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  64. great recipe! i have been wanting to try some healthy crackers to snack on… i will try this with more spices 🙂 may be some cumin and black pepper!! yummy 🙂

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  65. Lovely pictures and great simple recipe. I’ve been experimenting with all sorts of gluten-free crackers lately. These flax crackers will surely be included. What dip or spread do you recommend with it?

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  66. I’m making these tomorrow morning, and I’m betting that I’ll polish them off for lunch. They look SO good.

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  67. sounds yummy! not to sounds stupid, but are flax meal and groud flax the same?? i think they are, but sometimes i am very wrong! =)

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  68. 5 stars
    Great recipe! I love the idea of making crackers (without any wheat or sugar) – I’m off today and I just might try this recipe out! Happy Monday to you.

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