7 Best Vegan Calcium Supplements for Bone Health in 2023

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According to a recent review, many vegans aren't getting enough calcium in their diet. Registered Dietician, SaVanna Shoemaker, offers her top picks for vegan calcium supplements and insight into vegan food sources of calcium.

Most vegans probably aren’t getting enough calcium in their diet. 

According to one review of studies, which included 12 studies and about 12,000 participants, vegans typically consume about 750 mg of calcium per day — which falls short of the 1,000-1,200 mg Recommended Dietary Allowance for most adults (1, 2).

Why is this a problem? Well, calcium is needed for more than just bone health — although it does form a significant portion of the bone matrix.

However, when you don’t eat enough calcium, your body simply leaches calcium from your bones to meet the need in other parts of your body. Over time, this can lead to frail and brittle bones, and bone loss conditions such as osteoporosis (3).

To prevent this, it may be a good idea to take a calcium supplement if you follow a vegan diet. Below you’ll find some of our favorites. As always, we recommend speaking with your healthcare provider before starting any new supplement regimen.

Our Picks at a Glance

What to Look for in a Vegan Calcium Supplement

Calcium supplements aren’t necessarily always vegan. Some non-vegan calcium supplements may be made from animal bones or oyster shells, so it’s important that you study the label carefully to make sure that your calcium supplement is vegan. 

Next, if you’re taking calcium to support bone health, you may be interested in supplementing with some other bone health-supporting nutrients as well. These include vitamin D3, magnesium, and vitamin K2. There are several products available that contain calcium, as well as all of these other nutrients.

Finally, you’ll also want to make sure that the supplement you’re purchasing is from a reputable company. Ideally, their products are third-party tested to ensure that the label is accurate and the product is safe. However, if a product isn’t third-party tested, then things like reviews or certifications may help you to gauge a company’s reputation and trustworthiness.

Best Calcium Supplements

1. Best Overall: Future Kind Vegan Calcium Supplement

500 mg (38% of the Daily Value) calcium per serving

Future Kind Vegan Calcium Supplement.
Image courtesy of Future Kind

Future Kind is our best overall pick for a few reasons. The calcium in this supplement is totally natural — derived from sustainably sourced, Icelandic red marine algae. It provides 38% of the DV for calcium, so it’s designed to work alongside a healthy, balanced diet that contains calcium. All of Future Kind’s vegan vitamins are also third-party tested.

Additionally, this supplement provides some natural magnesium and other trace minerals as well. Like calcium, magnesium is a key mineral in our bone matrix (4).

One serving is two capsules.

2. Best with Magnesium: Global Healing Calcium & Magnesium

90 mg (6% of the DV) calcium per serving

Global Healing Calcium and Magnesium supplement.
Image courtesy of Global Healing

Global Healing Calcium & Magnesium contains a 2:1 ratio of absorbable calcium and magnesium, which is considered to be an ideal ratio of calcium and magnesium for reducing inflammation (5).

The calcium is in the form of calcium orotate, which — according to Global Healing — may be better absorbed than other forms of calcium.

One serving consists of two capsules and provides only 6% of the DV, but you can take up to three servings per day to provide 24% of the DV. Global Healing products are also third-party tested.

3. Best with Vitamin D: HUM Nutrition Got Calcium

630 mg (48% of the DV) calcium per serving

HUM Nutrition Got Calcium supplement.
Image courtesy of HUM Nutrition

Vitamin D helps with calcium absorption, so many calcium supplements contain added vitamin D. Vitamin D is also another nutrient that many people, vegans and non-vegans alike, struggle to get enough of (2, 6).

Got Calcium from HUM Nutrition provides calcium and vitamin D together, so that you can be sure that the calcium you consume is more likely to be absorbed.

One serving is two tablets, and Get Calcium is third-party tested.

4. Best Budget Option: DEVA Vegan Cal-Mag Plus

1000 mg (77% of the DV) calcium per serving

If you’re on a budget, the Vegan Cal-Mag Plus from DEVA Nutrition is a great choice. It’s significantly less expensive than the other products on this list, but still contains significant doses of calcium, vitamin D, magnesium, and other nutrients and herbs to support bone health and calcium absorption.

The supplement provides four different sources of calcium (calcium carbonate, calcium malate, calcium amino acid chelate, and calcium citrate), which may help to increase absorption compared to a supplement that contains just calcium carbonate or calcium citrate (7).

A serving consists of three tablets. This product is not third party tested, but is certified vegan.

5. Best Organic: Garden of Life MyKind Organics Organic Plant Calcium

800 mg (62% of the DV) calcium per serving

For a natural, whole food-based, organic option, consider the Organic Plant Calcium from Garden of Life. It contains algae-based calcium and magnesium, along with vitamin D and vitamin K2. Vitamin K2 supplementation may help to improve the effectiveness of vitamin D and calcium supplements for bone health (8).

It also contains an Organic Plant Calcium Blend, consisting of various organic fruits and vegetables that may help support bone health. 

One serving is 3 tablets. The product isn’t third party tested, but is certified vegan and organic.

6. Best Gummy: Mary Ruth’s K2 + D3 Calcium Gummies

100 mg (8% of the DV) calcium per serving

Calcium isn’t typically offered in a gummy form, but this supplement from Mary Ruth’s is available for anyone who prefers gummy vitamins or who may have trouble swallowing pills.

In addition to plant-based calcium, this gummy also provides vitamin D and vitamin K2. It’s also made with organic ingredients. However, a serving provides a fairly low amount of calcium.

Each serving consists of just one gummy. Mary Ruth’s products are third-party tested.

7. Best for Bone Health: Naturelo Bone Strength Plant Calcium Complex

600 mg (46% of the DV) calcium per serving

Finally, for a well-rounded bone health supplement that contains several nutrients to support strong bones, consider Naturelo’s Bone Strength Plant Calcium Complex.

It contains bone health superstars calcium, vitamin D, magnesium, and vitamin K2, but also provides vitamin C, zinc, boron, and silica — which may all also play a role in bone health and bone mineral density (9, 10, 11, 12).

Vegan Foods that Are High in Calcium

Contrary to popular belief, dairy products aren’t the only way to get plenty of calcium through your diet. 

If you’d rather not take a supplement, there are several vegan foods to help you reach your daily calcium goal — you just have to be strategic about including these sources in your plant-based diet. 

In fact, dietary calcium appears to be easier to absorb and more beneficial than calcium supplements (13).

Here are some of the best plant-based sources of calcium, according to the U.S. National Institutes of Health (2):

  • Calcium-fortified orange juice, 1 cup: 27% of the Daily Value (DV)
  • Firm tofu (made with calcium sulfate), ½ cup: 19% of the DV
  • Soft tofu (made with calcium sulfate), ½ cup: 11% of the DV
  • Cooked soybeans, ½ cup: 10% of the DV
  • Fortified breakfast cereal, 1 serving: 10% of the DV
  • Boiled and drained spinach, ½ cup: 9% of the DV
  • Boiled turnip greens, ½ cup: 8% of the DV
  • Cooked kale, 1 cup: 7% of the DV
  • Chia seeds, 1 tablespoon: 6% of the DV
  • Raw bok choy, 1 cup: 6% of the DV

Minimally processed soy products, leafy greens, and calcium-fortified juices and cereals can all help you meet your daily calcium goal on a well-planned vegan diet.

Calcium Supplementation FAQ

How much calcium supplement should a vegan take?

Vegan calcium supplements provide a wide range of calcium amounts, with some providing as little as 6% of the DV and others providing up to 77%. 

It’s best to choose one that’s a good complement to the amount of calcium you typically get in your diet. If you consistently eat calcium rich foods like soy products, green leafy vegetables, and calcium-fortified foods, then a lower dosage of calcium in your supplement is probably fine.

However, if you don’t eat a lot of these foods on a consistent basis, it’s best to choose a supplement that provides more calcium.

Is it safe to take calcium supplements daily?

There have been several concerns about the safety of calcium supplements. One is that calcium supplements may increase your risk of heart disease by promoting blood vessel calcification. There are also concerns that calcium supplements may increase your risk of developing calcium-based kidney stones (13).

However, the risk of these must be weighed against the risk of osteoporosis and the many complications it may cause.

Overall, it’s ideal for you to get all of your calcium from diet alone. But, we know that the ideal isn’t always realistic.

Because vegans tend to fall short on calcium intake, taking a calcium supplement while working towards increasing dietary calcium intake to a point where the supplement is no longer necessary may be the healthiest choice for bone health and overall health.

SaVanna Shoemaker

About the Author

SaVanna Shoemaker, MS, RDN, LD is a registered dietitian and freelance writer based in Little Rock, Arkansas. After her own lifelong struggles with weight, she pursued an education in dietetics as an undergraduate at Louisiana Tech University. She completed her dietetic internship and earned her Master of Science in human nutrition at The University of Southern Mississippi. After becoming a registered dietitian in 2013, she worked in various settings – including research, public health, dialysis, and hospitals – before becoming a full-time writer. Her work has been published on several high-profile media sites, including Healthline, Greatist, Bicycling, and mindbodygreen. She’s currently a contributor for Forbes, Sports Illustrated Showcase, and Mashable writing about all things lifestyle, wellness, sleep, and tech. Professionally, her interests include integrative and functional nutrition, sustainable weight loss, and holistic health – how nutrition, sleep, stress, and fitness intersect to affect whole-body wellness. In her personal life, she’s a homeschooling mom of three and an avid gardener, reader, and home cook.

savanna@cleangreensimple.com